Listening Place

A relationship with ‘place’ has the potential to transform our practice as educators. As Gruenewald (2003a) states, “an understanding of it [place] is key to understanding the nature of our relationships with each other and the world” (p.622). Yet, renowned nature writer Hay (as cited in Gessner, 2005) has said that one of the worst things happening on the planet right now is that we are “forgetting about localities”, our place in the world where we take root, take responsibility and form community (p.16). The result being that we become increasingly alienated from the neighbours (human and more-than-human) that we occupy this earth with and the lessons they might offer us (Baker, 2005; Evernden, 1993). It seems as though even the field of outdoor education is not immune to this trend.

Read more …